click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20110725
20110725
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
in afghanistan. fourthly, a plan of a special envoy -- appointment of a special envoy. when you make these recommendations, are you saying we're not curly undertaking any of them or do you see some of them as an expansion of what we are doing? or as i was in before, more of a focused approach? >> sir, i served in iraq and afghanistan. you see again and again, usaid, the state department, having difficulties. it when i started working on yemen, it is a familiar situation to me, although, it is not iraq and afghanistan. it is focused on working with local partners that may or may not work in the areas we are mostly concerned with. it is overly centralized, very focused on process and sort of the factions that in the national capital. i cannot take with the political opposition is. that is the political opposition we need to be worried about. but we do not have a good understanding of the human terrain. and iraq, could almost happen by accident. -- it on this happen by accident. i think most of our human terrain is probably focused on the counter-terrorism mission. it is not about the h
spending in iraq and -- of spending in iraq and afghanistan. how about that? we will spend more than $833 million in the next three days in kabul and baghdad. in part to help build clean water systems there. in part to help create jobs there. i just think that's inexcusable that we find ourselves in a position where we're spending in two or three days in iraq and afghanistan when we could spend to eliminate this cut and provide clean drinking water for the people of our country. the amount of subsidies we're going to give oil companies. the oil companies made record profits in 2010. they made about $60 billion in profits, if i'm not mistaken. $77 billion, actually, in profits last year. we'll spend six times as much of this cut in the clean drinking water fund to give money away to those oil companies this year. these are people who made $77 billion in profits last year, whose stocks are off the charts, who are paying their c.e.o.'s hundreds of millions of dollars in compensation, and we're going to give them about $7 billion from the wallets of the people of this country this year. that'
drawing down the cost of our military efforts in afghanistan and iraq. last year we spent a little over $150 billion. this year we'll spend a little over $100 billion. and the plan is to soon be down to at least $50 billion in two or three years. so over the ten-year period there'll be about eight years at nearly $50 billion or so spent on the war instead of $150 billion. that's part of the plan that we've been operating on for a long time. $150 billion for the war is not baseline expenditure of the united states. it was never projected to continue at that level, so hopefully we could bring it below $50 billion. maybe we went get to $50 billion. i don't know. but what is the reasonable estimate? i think the house republicans and the president said it would drop to $50 billion, and that would be the baseline out there for the rest of the time. that's $1 trillion. that's $1 trillion. so you take $1 trillion out of the $2.7 trillion, you're down to $1.7 trillion. and another thing that's scored in that, since that $1 trillion in war costs is scored the way mr. reid scored that, which is ph
of the wars in afghanistan and pakistan. >> still not getting serious. >> i went away from fuzzy. >> is that like jerry at trick math? >> yes. >> are you surprised they don't have a deal today? i actually really -- i mean, i really thought -- >> i would be shocked if they don't have a deal in the next two or three days. again, republican freshmen may have a big ideology difference with barack obama and his world view, and the divide is no greater than ronald reagan's was with tip o'neal in 1983 when they sat down, and they did a kneel. yes, you differ with barack obama and the democrats, but -- >> usually you are good at seeing somebody's angle. like you know what their angle was. what is the angle here? i don't get it. >> these republicans believe this is their only opportunity -- >> are they so stuck to the contract with the tea party they cannot think outside the box for the good of the country? seriously? >> can i finish? you asked a question and i need to finish. they understand one thing. >> what do they understand? >> they are dead right about this. this is their best chan
are not really new but simply counting the saving from the wind down of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. senate republicans say reid was with them on a two-step increase process, but that the white house shot that down. and the white house says it's all up to boehner to find a way forward. now, pressure is mounting, so is anxiety over the markets. here's white house chief of staff bill daley on "meet the press" yesterday. >> we are now getting to a point where i think markets around the world will question whether the political system in washington can come together and compromise for the greater good of the. >> country. >> the new fear. a downgrade in america's credit rating even if a debt creeling is raised. if only for six or nine months if it looks like washington can't figure out a long-term debt and deficit issue. by the way, something else going on here. the white house is basically out of the talks. harry reid is proxy for the white house. there isn't much communication going on between house republicans and the white house. it looked like yesterday morning that might not be the case. r
and afghanistan. republicans say the markets might not buy that but the same accounting tool was used in the republican budget that passed the house. jon: interesting to that the secretary of state commenting on tkphes particular spending matter. thank you. jenna: the lack of debt deal seems to be one of the factors in the stock market as wendell was talking about. the dow trading down by 60 points . it was down by over a hundred earlier. simon constable is a columnist for the "wall street journal." what is your take? we talk about the reassurance for the market? what about the reassurance for the average investor. >> most of the markets are saying whatever. but the gold market isn't. we've seen gold come up from 1500 a month ago to over 1600 now. jenna: what does that tell you. >> people don't buy golds as a good investment. you have to pay money to have it stored, buy insurance, put it in a bank, with armed guards and people are basically big thumb's down to the u.s. government when they buy gold. you shouldn't be totally reassured. that is quite a move in that sort of short period
in discretionary spending. also a lot of money from war money. he's saying as afghanistan and iraq wrap up, there's about a trillion dollars in savings. that's kind of controversial, brooke, because republicans don't count that money. but bottom line, $2.7 trillion all in savings cuts. you might like all them. that's what he's saying. he has a longer term committee in here but it would just make recommendations for long-term reform, really would have a vote on that but wouldn't force those reforms to happen. >> so i want to look at this plan here that you now have. i want to look at what supporters would say and also opponents. from everything i've been reading trying to keep up with all of this, the big difference here from the democrats' side there's no mention of revenue increases, correct? >> huge concession from democrats. the whole time democrats say there must be revenue on the table, republicans say they can't be. now democrats are dropping that huge demand. here is what supporters would say. this plan gets it done. they would say we're out of time. we're in the going to push for all of o
is going to count winding down the war in afghanistan as a substantial part of the savings. that could be worth about $1 trillion over 10 years. meanwhile, john boehner is working on his own deficit- reduction debt limit increase plan. he would take -- that plan would be affected in two stages. the first would be $900 trillion or so deficit reduction package, spending cuts, paired with roughly equal amount in debt limit increase. then he would empower a special committee to find an additional $1.60 trillion to authorize or trigger another increase in the debt ceiling. the problem with this proposal, however, it would require raising the debt ceiling by the requisite $2.40 trillion amount into the stages. that is something the president and democratic leaders after yesterday's said is a nonstarter. they say it would create too much uncertainty for the marketplace and the economy if this process had to be replaced at the beginning of next year or summer of next year. >> the house republicans made their own at last it with a cap and balance plan that did not make it to the senate. the pre
eliminating money with the wars in be afghanistan and iraq. that's also future looking. so i'm asking you today in terms of changes to the tax code for corporations because we know there's plenty of corporations that last year ended up paying relatively little or no taxes at all. are you putting forward anything in terms of corporate tax reform that you would be willing to undo in loop loopholes today? is. >> i think we all agree tax loopholes are something we can do about, that's definitely an area we compromise on without any difficulty whatsoever. but the point is putting in a system of tax reform that is simpler, flatter, less cumbersome especially for our business owners in the cost of doing business. so this is what we're looking at. but we are definitely against any tax increases, any tax increases alone. martha: all right, so goldman sachs if they don't get $4 trillion, what happens is a plan that's short of $4 trillion in real spending cuts, they're likely to downgrade their rating on u.s. debt. what do you think about that? >> well, you know, that's unfortunately what we're face
blocks, we all have in common and you look around these clips from afghanistan to iraq to california to copenhagen, wherever it is, and you see actually everybody is frightened of death, everybody loves their children, you know, so that sense of unity is very reassuring i find, many optimistic. i'm a pessimistic european. normally i think life miserable but this made me think life is pretty great actually. >> i hate movie critics. nobody ever writes about a movie why i would want to see it. if i'm telling my buddies why they should see this movie, what's the pitch is this. >> it is a time capsule of a moment on earth and it's made into a movie, almost 4,500 hours, made into a movie. it's a series of youtube clips. well, it's actually made to feel like it's 95 minutes long and you go on a journey, you start at midnight on one day and end at midnight on the next and you experience the world in that day and you laugh and you relate to characters and i think you cry a bit. i had a screen last night at the museum of modern art, people were in floods of tears, but they also feel uplifted b
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)